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Noticeboard

Click here to Access the on-line appointment system

Patients are reminded that they can have on-line access so you can organise your medical centre activities (booking appointments or requesting repeat prescriptions) at a time that is convenient to you.

Remember that on-the-day appointments are released on-line for patients every day-so you can book your own appointment on-line rather telephone the practice during the busiest periods.  You can also book telephone aconsultations to speak to a GP about an on-going issue.  Telephone consultations are not 'Face to Face' so make sure you book the correct appointment.

Speak to a Receptionist about how to obtain an on-line account.

To promote national self care week (14th to 20th November 2016) we have provided information to support you to self care. See the SELF CARE section to the right.

Do the HOW ARE YOU QUIZ .

 TELEPHONE CONSULTATIONS

TELEPHONE CONSULTATIONS WITH GPs ARE FOR 5 MINUTES AND ARE NOT FACE TO FACE APPOINTMENTS.  THESE TELEPHONE APPOINTMENTS ARE BEST USED TO TALK ABOUT TEST RESULTS OR TO FOLLOW UP ON SIMPLE ISSUES.  Please DO NOT ATTEND TELEPHONE APPOINTMENTS as the doctor may be working at a different location and may not be at the Practice that day.

Note about the Telephone system

The telephone system can handle more simultaneous callers in the morning when we are very busy and it will let patients know where they are in the queue. Patients can leave messages when the queries about their blood results or if they have a questions about a referral.

Blood test and other queries line: Contact the practice between 09:30 – 13:00 Monday to Friday! (Please check under 'New Services' for more details)

 

For Your diary

To help you plan your requests for any repeat medications the Bank Holidays coming up in 2016 are listed below.  You should plan ahead to give us a bit more time to arrange your repeat medications by making you requests at least five working days earlier around these busy periods.

  • Friday 25th March 2016
  • Monday 28th March 2016
  • Monday 2nd May 2016
  • Monday 30th May 2016
  • Monday 29th August 2016
  • Monday 26th December 2016
  • Tuesday 27th December 2016 (for Christmas Day)

 

 

 

 

 

Prescribing generic medicines policy

Northend Medical Centre where ever possible will always prescribe medicine using their generic names, rather than the brand name, unless there are special circumstances as stated below. NHS GPs are encouraged to prescribe medicines by their generic name. This is because generic medicines are usually as effective as the branded versions, but can cost up to 80% less. The National Health Service is paid for by the taxes you pay. The NHS has a duty to use that money wisely and effectively – to make sure we provide the most care for the best value. The NHS uses the term “cost effectiveness”. That doesn’t mean cheap is always best. An expensive drug that works is more cost effective than a cheap one that doesn’t. But if two drugs do the same thing the cheaper one is more cost effective, i.e. a better buy. This frees up NHS resources to pay for other treatments. It also gives the pharmacist the widest choice of products to dispense. This can be important, particularly if there is a shortage of a particular product.

Switching to a generic medicine

If your prescriber changes your regular prescription from a branded medicine to a generic version, they will tell you about the change before you collect your prescription. This is to ensure you understand that although your medicine may have a different name, it will still contain the same active ingredient. Your pharmacist can also be a helpful source of information and advice when this happens. When you pick up your prescription, the medicine may look different and there will be a different name on the label. However, it will contain the same active ingredient as the medicine you used before.

Generic medicines with different activity

In rare cases, it is important for a patient to stay on the branded medicine previously prescribed for them, rather than changing to a generic medicine. In such cases, the branded medicine is the most suitable product. Some examples of when you should keep taking your brand of prescribed medicine, (NOT GENERIC) include:

  • Epilepsy medicines – these should be treated with care because different versions may have slight differences in the way they are absorbed, which can cause big differences in their effect. For example, prescribers may decide the branded version of lamotrigine (Lamictal) is more suitable than the generic version.
  • Modified-release preparations of medicines – such as modified-release versions of theophylline, nifedipine, diltiazem and verapamil. A branded version may sometimes be a better option than the generic equivalent, as they can be absorbed differently.
  • Biological medicines – these complex medicines are derived from proteins and other substances produced by the body. Copies of biological medicines, called biosimilars, can never be exactly the same so shouldn't be automatically used as substitutes. Doctors should always reference the brand name so the manufacturer and batch could be identified if there were any problems with the medicine.
  • Ciclosporin – a medicine that suppresses the immune system (the body's natural defence system). Different branded versions may cause different levels of ciclosporin in your blood.
  • Mesalazine – which is used to treat ulcerative colitis (a long-term condition that affects the colon). The way that mesalazine is absorbed varies between different brands.
  • Lithium – this treats a number of mental health conditions. Different brands vary widely in terms of how much of the medicine is absorbed and becomes active.

Beclometasone dipropionate CFC-free inhalers to treat asthma – there are two inhalers that contain the same active substance (beclometasone dipropionate), but one is much stronger

 
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